Bruce Lee Actor. Cracking The Western Movie Industry.

Bruce Lee’s illustrious acting career went above and beyond the western movie industry and had cemented him as a pop icon to the entire world. Before starring in films like Enter the Dragon, Bruce Lee’s illustrious acting career went above and beyond the western movie industry and had cemented him as a pop icon to the entire world. Before starring in films like Enter the Dragon, the martial arts expert had many encounters with the art of films ever since his father introduced him to the entertainment industry at an extremely early age.

Had it not been for Lee’s movies produced in the early 70s, it’s arguable whether or not the genre of martial art films would have penetrated the mainstream Western cinema over the last few decades.

The influence of East Asian martial arts techniques on cinema is so great today that you will find it in many genres that include science fiction, action, drama, horror, and animation. But where did it all begin? We all have to thank Bruce Lee for the phenomenon he was and his contribution towards Western cinema.

Bruce Lee actor –the early years

Despite being born in San Francisco, Bruce Lee grew up in Hong Kong. His father, an opera singer and a part-time actor, was the one who introduced him to the entertainment industry at a very early age. The younger Lee quickly soon began appearing in films where his role would be to play a street urchin or a juvenile delinquent mostly. Lee’s first role as a baby was in the movie Golden Gate Girl when he was just six months old.

Growing up, Bruce Lee got into a lot of trouble due to his temper and connection with local gangs with whom he taught himself kung fu. It was during this time he also started to partake in dance lessons, and he was exceptionally brilliant in that. In the year 1958, Lee even won the Hong Kong cha-cha championship thanks to his refined footwork and balance.

However, his fame was short-lived in Hong Kong as Lee’s parents and decided to send him back to the United States just after he turned 18.

Life in the US – the first break

After being increasingly disturbed by young Lee’s streetfighting reputation and encounter with the police, Lee’s parents sent their son back to the United States for good. He then began living with his family friends located in Seattle, and it is there he attended high school and studied philosophy and drama at the University of Washington.

Lee opened his first martial arts school while staying in Seattle and relocated to Oakland in 1964.The second school was started by Bruce Lee in Oakland, California, and it is in this time he began developing his own technique, the world-renowned jeet kune do. His mastery of the style of martial arts earned him a lot of students/clients, and he eventually drew the attention of a television producer after attending a demonstration session at a karate tournament in Los Angeles.

It was here Lee got his first big break and got cast as a sidekick Kato in the television series going by the name of The Green Hornet (1966 to 1967). Unfortunately, Lee’s luck ran out as the TV show was canceled, which forced him to give private jeet kune do lessons to Hollywood stars for supplementing his income.

Cracking the western movie industry

As ironic as it may sound, Bruce Lee’s success in the western film industry has its roots in Hong Kong where he moved back in 1971 after failing to find suitable roles in America. In Hong Kong, Lee starred in two films and both of them shattered box office records throughout Asia. This made Lee a household name not only in Asia, but directors and producers back in America were also forced to take note.

He moved back to the United States and starred in films like Tang shan da xiong, Fists of Fury, The Big Boss, and The Chinese Connection. Some of these movies were successes in both Hong Kong and United States, and this propelled Lee’s growth in the industry.

He later formed his own production house and directed, wrote, co-produced, and starred in films such as Return of the Dragon. Then, he came back with a bang by releasing Enter the Dragon in 1973. This movie was his first joint venture between the US and Hong Kong-based production companies, and it became a box office hit throughout the world.

But before Bruce Lee would get to enjoy his international movie stardom, he met his tragic demise six days before Enter the Dragon’s Hong Kong release.

At that time, Bruce Lee had already been working on a movie called Game of Death, which was eventually pieced together by using cardboard cutouts of Lee’s face and stand-ins. After his death, all of Lee’s films gained a massive cult following that turned him into perhaps the biggest movie icon of the 20th century.

Philosophy

Even though Bruce Lee is best known for being an actor and a martial artist, his philosophical viewpoints are something worth discussing. He studied drama alongside Western and Asian philosophy at the University of Washington and later by himself as guidance to a path. Bruce Lee was well read and had a big library full of philosophical textbooks, which were responsible for mirroring his own fighting beliefs.

He believed that any knowledge gained is the path to self-knowledge and martial arts was merely his chosen form to explain the metaphor of such philosophical teachings. Even though his influences include Buddhism, Taoism, and many such religious and spiritual views, it can be said that Bruce Lee was an atheist in some way. When asked about his religious affiliation in 1972, Lee replied “none whatsoever.”

His philosophy encompasses the development of both the body and mind to attain a higher level of consciousness.

The Star that shines on!

Bruce Lee was not only an amazing martial artist and movie star, but he generally possessed an incredible amount of charisma that touched the lives of many fans around the world. He was a superstar like no other and through a handful of movies he left behind an unforgettable impression on the tapestry of the art of film making. No matter how many stars come and go, there won’t be any other shining as bright as Bruce Lee.

The martial arts expert had many encounters with the art of films ever since his father introduced him to the entertainment industry at an extremely early age.
Had it not been for Lee’s movies produced in the early 70s, it’s arguable whether or not the genre of martial art films would have penetrated the mainstream Western cinema over the last few decades.
The influence of East Asian martial arts techniques on cinema is so great today that you will find it in many genres that include science fiction, action, drama, horror, and animation. But where did it all begin? We all have to thank Bruce Lee for the phenomenon he was and his contribution towards Western cinema.

Bruce Lee actor —the early years

Despite being born in San Francisco, Bruce Lee grew up in Hong Kong. His father, an opera singer and a part-time actor, was the one who introduced him to the entertainment industry at a very early age. The younger Lee quickly soon began appearing in films where his role would be to play a street urchin or a juvenile delinquent mostly. Lee’s first role as a baby was in the movie Golden Gate Girl when he was just six months old.
Growing up, Bruce Lee got into a lot of trouble due to his temper and connection with local gangs with whom he taught himself kung fu. It was during this time he also started to partake in dance lessons, and he was exceptionally brilliant in that In the year 1958, Lee even won the Hong Kong cha-cha championship thanks to his refined footwork and balance.
However, his fame was short-lived in Hong Kong as Lee’s parents and decided to send him back to the United States just after he turned 18.
Life in the US — the first break
After being increasingly disturbed by young Lee’s streetfighting reputation and encounter with the police, Lee’s parents sent their son back to the United States for good. He then began living with his family friends located in Seattle, and it is there he attended high school and studied philosophy and drama at the University of Washington.
Lee opened his first martial arts school while staying in Seattle and relocated to Oakland in 1964.The second school was started by Bruce Lee in Oakland, California, and it is in this time he began developing his own technique, the world-renowned feet kune do. His mastery of the style of martial arts earned him a lot of students/clients, and he eventually drew the attention of a television producer after attending a demonstration session at a karate tournament in Los Angeles.
It was here Lee got his first big break and got cast as a sidekick Kato in the television series going by the name of The Green Hornet (1966 to 1967). Unfortunately, Lee’s luck ran out as the TV show was canceled, which forced him to give private feet kune do lessons to Hollywood stars for supplementing his income.
Cracking the western movie industry
As ironic as it may sound, Bruce Lee’s success in the western film industry has its roots in Hong Kong where he moved back in 1971 after failing to find suitable roles in America. In Hong Kong, Lee starred in two films and both of them shattered box office records throughout Asia. This made Lee a household name not only in Asia, but directors and producers back in America were also forced to take note.
He moved back to the United States and starred in films like Tang shan da xiong, Fists of Fury, The Big Boss, and The Chinese Connection. Some of these movies were successes in both Hong Kong and United States, and this propelled Lee’s growth in the industry.
He later formed his own production house and directed, wrote, co-produced, and starred in films such as Return of the Dragon. Then, he came back with a bang by releasing Enter the Dragon in 1973. This movie was his first joint venture between the US and Hong Kong-based production companies, and it became a box office hit throughout the world.
But before Bruce Lee would get to enjoy his international movie stardom, he met his tragic demise six days before Enter the Dragon’s Hong Kong release.
At that time, Bruce Lee had already been working on a movie called Game of Death, which was eventually pieced together is using cardboard cutouts of Lee’s face and stand-ins. After his death, all of Lee’s films gained a massive cult following that turned him into perhaps the biggest pop culture icons of the 20th century.
Philosophy
Even though Bruce Lee is best known for being an actor and a martial artist, his philosophical viewpoints are something worth discussing. He studied drama alongside Western and Asian philosophy at the University of Washington and later by himself as guidance to a path. Bruce Lee was well read and had a big library full of philosophical textbooks, which were responsible for mirroring his own fighting beliefs.
He believed that any knowledge gained is the part to self-knowledge and martial arts was merely his chosen form to explain the metaphor of such philosophical teachings. Even though his influences include Buddhism, Taoism, and many such religious and spiritual views, it can be said that Bruce Lee was an atheist in some way. When asked about his religious affiliation in 1972, Lee replied “none whatsoever.”
His philosophy encompasses the development of both the body and mind to attain a higher level of consciousness.
The Star that shines on!
Bruce Lee was not only an amazing martial artist and movie star, but he generally possessed an incredible amount of charisma that touched the lives of many fans around the world. He was a superstar like no other and through a handful of movies he left behind an unforgettable impression on the tapestry of the art of film making. No matter how many stars come and go, there won’t be any other shining as bright as Bruce Lee.